1 in 4 people killed in cars
were not wearing a seat belt

01.05.2019

A new report published this week reveals that 1 in 4 people killed in cars on the roads in 2017 were not wearing a seat belt.

The report shows that despite wearing rates of 98.6% for British car drivers, 27% of those who died in cars on the roads in 2017 were not wearing a seat belt. This amounts to more than 200 deaths; an additional 1,000 people were seriously injured.

Launched by the Parliamentary Advisory Council for Transport Safety (PACTS), the document entitled ‘Seat Belts: The Forgotten Road Safety Priority’ suggests ‘the road safety community has taken its eye off the ball.’

David Davies, Executive Director of PACTS, said: “With the vast majority of drivers and passengers regularly wearing a seat belt, we thought this was a problem solved. It has been a shock to find that more than a 1 in 4 people killed in a car were not wearing a seat belt.

“In the event of a collision, wearing a seat belt is the single most effective thing that a driver or passenger can do to avoid serious injury.”

He added: “This report shows the road safety community has taken its eye off the ball. It points to ways to increase wearing among the minority who forget or chose not to do so.

“In particular, PACTS recommends making it an endorsable offence, with three penalty points. This would have no impact on most drivers or passengers but could substantially reduce the 1,200 people killed or seriously injured each year.” 

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